Your resume has been shortlisted, the telephonic interview has been cleared and now you’re invited for a face to face interview. All is well, and you are feeling confident. Then the interviewer says, “Tell me about a time when you…” UGH! Behavioral interview questions.

None of us enjoy answering these questions. Clearing this interview is not an easy task. Tackling behavioral questions is tricky hence you must prepare yourself for it. Behavioral job interviews, in a nutshell, deal with your past work experiences. These interviews depict how efficiently you managed circumstances at former positions. To help you ace your upcoming interview, we have listed a strategy that will work whenever you’re tasked with answering behavioral interview questions. Let’s jump right into it.

Clear your mind before you sit for the interview.

Don’t go in the interview with overlapping thoughts. Sit alone and clear your thoughts. Through your narrative, your interviewer will get to know how you respond to situations at work. So, take a couple of seconds to consider this while you think of ideal stories for every situation. This way, you can make a proper introductory statement and what the moral of your story will be.

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What challenges have you faced?

If it’s a behavioral job interview, the panel will inevitably ask you about the problems you’ve faced. However, what matters the most is how you confronted those issues. Explain the issue or difficulties you’ve faced, but don’t emphasize too much on the negatives. Quickly shift to describing the way you solved the issue and the favorable outcomes

What about the mistakes you’ve made over time?

Everybody makes mistakes, and I can say for sure, you did as well. This question will pop up. This point goes hand in hand with the first one. Think about some of the significant mistakes you’ve made and what you learned from it. If these faults taught you something, it’s alright to discuss it. Try to put down your thoughts in a concise fashion. Don’t go overboard with your sob story. You’re going for an interview, not for a therapy session.

What would you do if you disagree with your boss?

This query is pretty popular, as well. The answer to this question can massively differ from person to person. Everybody has unique experiences, after all. Think this through. This might be one of the pivotal questions. Why you may ask? Well, the answer would give the panel an insight on your thought process at work and what timely actions do you take to prevent glitches at the initial stage itself.

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Your biggest achievement so far.

Needless to say, the interviewers will appreciate your accomplishments. Achievements showcase plenty of positive attributes. Talk about how these experiences have left a positive impact on you as an individual. You can get away with sharing a couple of personal stories here (make them inspirational) and how it has influenced your peers as well.

How do you react to different scenarios?

How would you respond in an extremely stressful situation or under pressure? Have you had experiences of this sort? If yes, it’s time to elaborate on them. Briefly explain how well did you manage yourself. Consider linking the narrative back to the organization or position you are interviewing for. Instantly describing how your expertise would be useful for the role is almost always a powerful ending. 

Last but not least, follow the STAR method.

STAR, in this case, stands for Situation, Task, Action, Result. This method can work in conjunction with all of the points mentioned above. To keep it brief, when you answer a behavioral question, explain the situation; talk about the major tasks you were involved in and completed successfully; elaborate on the actions taken; talk about the end results and statistics to wrap it up.