Do you want to continue to attract, engage and retain the top talent? Then you must invest in employer branding. Employer branding is everywhere, literally! Today, more and more companies have started to focus on creating a brand. The employer brand communicates an organization’s identity to both its potential and the current employees. It revolves around the company’s mission, vision, values, and culture. An organization having a positive employer brand image speaks for itself.

With an increase in the population of job seekers, you must showcase your company in the best possible way to attract the top talent in the market. 

Did you know? 

75% of job seekers consider an employer’s brand before even applying for a job.

Now you can say that the employer brand is the face of your organization. The image a company describes through branding and reviews help in building your real picture in the mind of the candidates.

What is employer branding?

Employer branding is a process of building your organization’s reputation as a desirable place to work with. Employer brand is all about marketing your company to your internal employees as well as potential employees. The stronger your game it, the more likely you are to attract top emerging talent. An employer brand, also known as your “talent,” or “people” brand, explains how unique your company is and what it stands for. This is exactly what you communicate when a potential employee asks for a day-to-day walkthrough during an interview. The basic rule of employer branding is never to compare yourself to others. 

Unsure if it’s a big deal?

Understanding the significance of employer branding is essential for any company that aims to be “the best companies to work for.” 

Before we begin, you must not miss out on these recruitment trends:

  • 9 out of 10 candidates would apply for a job when it’s from an employer brand that’s actively maintained, and if they don’t like the company, then approximately 69% of the candidates won’t apply even if they are unemployed. 
  • When deciding on where to apply for a job, 84% of job seekers say the reputation of a company as an employer is important
  • 50% of candidates say they wouldn’t work for a company with a bad reputation – even for a pay increase

Now, let’s take a look at the reasons broadcasting the importance of employer branding to organizations: 

1.Reduced cost per hire

According to LinkedIn, an organization having a stronger employer brand than its competitors on average, see a 43% decrease in the cost per candidate they hire. This is only achieved when a company has a strong employer brand so that it does not have to spend a lot on marketing and other advertising campaigns. Having a sharp employer image also decreases the time to hire and improves the quality of hire. 

2. Attract and retain quality employees

An approximate figure of 70-80% of job seekers states that they look at the company reviews of numerous sites before applying for the job. While on the other hand, even the recruiters say that being part of a highly reputed organization with a good culture is essential.

3. Reviews matter the most 

There is absolutely no doubt in the statement that salary is essential to the candidates, but it is not the only factor that drives them into a particular organization. The CareerBuilder reports that 67% of candidates would mostly accept lower pay if the organization they were interested in had very positive reviews online. 

Thus, one should not ignore investing in building a positive and strong employer brand. 

The big question: How to create a strong employer brand?

To build a strong and effective employer brand, one needs to think about the most alluring steps an organization can take. What if a candidate drops the job offer just because he is not sure about the benefits they will gain by getting in your organization. It might be possible that the company didn’t build a strong brand image. To get your name out there, you don’t just have to leverage advertising and other marketing tricks but use the voice of your employees. So, to create a strong employer brand, one needs to focus on making the organization a great place to work with, just like Google and some of the fast-growing startups like Oyo, Swiggy, Big Basket, Zomato. 

So, how can an organization make its name as a strong employer brand and attract a vast talent pool? Read on to find out. 

1. Advertise everything you would like to offer

An organization should market and promote even the smallest perk or key benefits they give to their employees. Even if it is a training program, a provision of giving time to their employees to study, and some offer resources to help their employees find places to stay. Such things can be precious to an employee.

2. Create and maintain a healthy organization culture

To attract top qualified talent, a company needs to provide their candidates with an experience and environment which no other company can give them. Provide them with a culture that they will crave for. It is the employees who create a brand for their organization. Make them love where they work and what they do, and word will spread like wildfire. – Sarah O’Neill, Digital Trends

3. Treat candidates like they are your customers

Nowadays, candidates treat the job search just like online shopping. As an essential part of the research, the job seekers look at the working style, office environment, the interview process. They are even interested in knowing the experience of other candidates. Thus, it is necessary to provide positive and impressive reviews of the employee journey.

4. Own your marketing space

Before advertising, make sure you know your target audience. Whether one target to post on one or multiple social media platforms, try to make an impact with the right content on the right platforms just like Microsoft uses Twitter to showcase #MicrosoftLife. This tactic is especially valuable if one tries to recruit candidates from an area that is outside the usual sphere of hiring. 

These points should get you set up to foster your employer brand and attract more right-fit hires.

Some of our favourite Employer Branding examples!

  • Starbucks- Opportunity to be more than an employee

Starbucks builds its brand through its employees. It has a @StarbucksJobs Instagram and Twitter account to promote their employer brand and interact with potential candidates. They also develop their links on LinkedIn and other social media platforms. The brand refers it employees as their partners, and they take pride in the brand they are working for. 

  • Google- Do cool things that matter

A brand with whom every individual wants to get associated. Their employee perks are known all over the world and not to forget their campus-style workplace. One should create a place or an organization with whom people feel attached. Google’s work hard and play hard environment inspires a lot of people and organizations. 

  • Hubspot

Hubspot voted as One of the Glassdoor’s best places to work for 2018. This company takes time to listen to their employees, featuring their opinions and stories heavily in posts on almost every social media channel. They value company culture and supports flexible work hours, unlimited vacation hours and tuition reimbursement.  

It is no longer sufficient for companies just to post jobs and keep waiting for the right candidate to come to them directly in search of employment. Instead, organizations should make specific efforts to prove that they are worthy employers and must make their employer brand a priority.

Never try to make your company seem like a fantastic place to work but strive to make it a fantastic place to work for your current employees. If you can do that, a big part of your employer branding will take care of itself.

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  1. […] Another Ivy League dropout who was too engaged in paving the way for new technologies and innovation. Bill Gates was a businessman right from the age of 15 when he went into business with Paul Allen, developing a computer program that monitored traffic patterns in Seattle called “Traf-o-Data.” Gates and Allen would form ‘“Micro-Soft” in 1975 from “micro-systems” and software, they dropped the hyphen within a year. […]

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